In East Coast Car Rentals' previous article about hidden Australia, we documented an abandoned rail tunnel, a tower fully encased in a glass dome, and a grisly justice museum on our tour of the country's weird and wonderful. How about a little prehistoric action, though? Let's lift the ancient lid and explore the Land Down Under's oldest secrets!

The best way to explore our broad, beautiful country is by car, so get in touch with East Coast Car Rentals today so we can help you choose which vehicle would be best suited to you needs – from a compact car to a 12-seater minibus, we're sure to have something perfect for you!

Lark Quarry Dinosaur Trackways, Queensland

Based in Australia's stark, appealing countryside, Lark Quarry freezes in time. Captured here is a scene that happened some 95 million years ago – not many places on Earth can lay claim to such a fact. Once you head 100 km southwest of the small town of Winton, you can really happen upon a scene that could be right out of Jurassic Park – only, all that remain are footprints. Footprints of dinosaurs.

Fossilised in the hard clay of Lark Quarry, baked solid by the fierce Queensland sun, are the footprints of a huge carnivorous dinosaur on the hunt for its next meal. How do we know this? Well, those prints gradually become further apart, indicating that it was charging at its prey. To add yet further evidence, there are smaller footprints scattered in all directions as the panicked prey attempt to desperately flee. 

There is no other such clear evidence of a dinosaur hunt on the planet, so a visit to Lark Quarry should definitely come top of your list of intriguing Aussie sites to visit. 

100 km southwest from the small town of Winton, you can really happen upon a scene that could be right out of Jurassic Park – only, all that remain are footprints. Footprints of dinosaurs.

The pink slugs of Mount Kaputar, New South Wales 

At the top of Mount Kaputar is a small alpine forest, and in that forest is a tiny snapshot of Australian flora and fauna that doesn't exist anywhere else on the planet. When Australia was covered in rainforests millions of years ago, the dryer climates that the continent has experienced since all but wiped out many of those prehistoric species – except those in this forest. 

That's because when Mount Kaputar erupted some 17 million years ago, it preserved the cooler, damper conditions required to keep the relics alive.

Perhaps the most eye-popping of the ancient beasties on Mount Kaputar are the giant pink slugs. Sometimes reaching 20 centimetres in length, these fluorescent creatures emerge after rainstorms to feast on tree moss. These slugs aren't just pink – they're bright pink! This mountain is also home to a colony of cannibal snails, who have taken a liking to their neon neighbours – as can be seen from their luminous pink slime trails!